Tag Archives: double treble

Crochet Tutorial – stitch height

Welcome to the second tutorial from Amanda Makes 🙂 how did you get on with the first tutorial? Are you feeling confident with your tools now? I hope so. If you would like to give any feedback about any of my tutorials, please email me. You can find my contact details on the about me page.

This tutorial is going to give you a quick look at the way in which crochet stitches work. There are several different crochet stitches, all of which differ in height. Here’s a quick photo I’ve written some labels on for you. Take notice of the varying height of each stitch. All crochet starts off with a flat foundation chain, that has no real height and the stitches increase in depth as you progress up.

crochetheight

Double crochet, the shortest stitch, gives a lovely dense fabric. I love the way it looks. It’s the stitch I used for my crocheted tea cosy – the dense fabric will make sure my teapot is nicely insulated! Double crochet is often used for making crocheted toys, like teddy bears. This is because the dense fabric that the double crochet creates makes sure that no stuffing can pop out of the toy!

Half trebles are the next size up, I find these to be used alot in crochet baby clothes. Dense enough to give good coverage but light enough to be free and easy for littleIMG_1465 arms 🙂

Trebles are often used for the granny square, one of the most delicious things anyone can make. They are so versatile. Here’s a giant granny square blanket that I have made  – it is so soft, but the height of the treble makes it a quick blanket to hook up. That said, the taller your stitch gets, the more you use to make it, and the more of a ‘yarn guzzler’ it becomes!

And now onto the real yarn guzzlers – the double and triple treble. Both of these stiches are very light and airy, making them perfect for lace work and for garments that need to have a very light feel to them, perhaps a summer shawl or a christening blanket.

I hope this little introduction to the different type of stitches has whet your appetite for the tutorials to come 🙂 In the next installment, we will be looking at creating the foundation chain – the flat row of ‘chains’ that is quite literally the foundation of all things crochet. As well as the foundation chain, we will be looking at the importance of the turning chain – an extra length of foundation chain that you use to get the height required for the stitch you will be using. I hope that this quick tutorial on stitches and their varying heights will help with your understanding of the turning chain.

See you soon 🙂